Field to Fork: An Upcoming Local Eating Event

field to fork panelists

(HealthCastle.com) Are you interested in learning about how to eat more local food in the Metro Vancouver area? If so, the City of Coquitlam Leadership Speakers Series is hosting an event you might want to attend. Field to Fork is a panel discussion about locally grown food: the benefits, the challenges, and how eating local impacts the food system. The panel features some distinguished names you probably already know if you're interested in the concept of local eating.

Field to Fork Details

  • What: A panel discussion about local food featuring five experts, plus a local food and beverage tasting.
  • When: Thursday, November 22. Food and beverage tasting at 6 p.m., speakers start at 7 p.m.
  • Who: The speakers are Alisa Smith, co-author of The 100 Mile Diet; Peter Ladner, former Vancouver City Councillor and author of The Urban Food Revolution: Changing the Way We Feed Cities; Andrea Carlson, former Executive Chef of Bishop’s Restaurant now a partner in a local grocery store and café; Stephen Gallagher, an organic farmer; and Janis Magnuson, a food security advocate.
  • Where: Evergreen Cultural Centre,1205 Pinetree Way, Coquitlam
  • How much? Tickets are $20 ($15 for groups of 10 or more) and are available through the Evergreen Cultural Centre Box Office 604-927-6555 or www.evergreenculturalcentre.cathe Evergreen Cultural Centre Box Office at 604-927-6555.

Top Ways to Eat a Local, Low-Carbon Diet in Vancouver

We've talked a lot on HealthCastle.com about local eating and eating a low-carbon diet, including some Vancouver-specific local eating tips and even some food tours based on local eating. If you're interested in a low-carbon, local diet but you can't make it to the Field to Fork event, try incorporating some of these strategies to help you choose more local food and reduce your carbon footprint.

vancouver shoreline skyline from stanley park

Go Local

  1. Read labels: Check anything that comes in a package for the country of origin, and choose products of Canada.
  2. Visit a farmers' market: Most farmers' markets have shut down for the winter, but the winter farmers' market is open at Nat Bailey Stadium every Saturday through April (stay tuned for more on that in a future post).
  3. Buy CSA shares: There are lots of CSA options from farms in the Fraser Valley, and even from the farm at UBC. Farm Folk City Folk has a list of CSAs in BC.
  4. Grow (some of) your own: Vancouver has a great climate for growing all kinds of vegetables - and even some fruits. Whether you're working with a windowsill, a balcony, a community garden plot, or a large yard, you can grow some of the food your family eats. We've got lots of gardening tips on HealthCastle!

Go Low-Carbon

  1. Choose seasonal items and go for less hothouse produce.
  2. Be aware of high-carbon foods: Even some local foods have a large carbon footprint. Meat and dairy, in particular, are higher-carbon items. You can be eco-friendly without going vegan by watching your portion size of these items or eating them less often.
  3. Skip the packaged foods: Packaging and processing use a ton of water, electricity, and other resources. I called it Un-HPF in my book, Go UnDiet!
  4. Keep your leftovers: Don't throw out leftover food - and make sure you actually remember to eat your leftovers once they find their way to your fridge or freezer!

There you have it - lots of ways for you to incorporate more local foods into your diet and reduce your carbon footprint, even if you can't make it to the Field to Fork event.

Tell us: Are you interested in local eating? Will you be going to the Field to Fork panel discussion to get insight from the expert panelists? Let us know in the comments.

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HealthCastle, founded in 1997, is the largest online nutrition community run by Registered Dietitians. Information on this site is provided for informational purposes and is not meant to substitute for the advice provided by your own physician or dietitian. Information and statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.